Midweek Music Picks: Pure Reason Revolution

Pure Reason Revolution are a band that caught my attention first as prog, but I soon realised they were inhabiting the prog genre at the most progressive, eclectic fringes of it – as you can tell upon listening to the song below, Blitzkrieg.

The music hovers between the electroclash rock of Justice, the fast-paced drum’n’bass rock fusion of Pendulum, and the chaotic soundscapes of electronica artist Hans Appelkvist: synthy guitar riffs and strong drumbeats are peppered with Eighties style Orchestra Hits, the odd house clap, before descending into broken rhythms and chopped-up blurts and bleeps, then building up again with polyphonic chorus into an insane fusion of sound, using noise as sculpture, painting crescendo onto seconds.

The slightly dystopian futuristic undertones of their themes (the intro samples of Blitzkrieg, for example, are from 1962 post-apocalyptic French film La Jetéesuggest something akin to Rush’s 2112, which makes sense considering the band’s first producer also produced Rush’s music.

Furthermore this band is from the town next to where I used to live in the UK (Reading – a wee bit north from the birthplace of Genesis). Nobody seems to know where to place them – they have been labelled prog, electronica, alt rock, new prog, and bizarrely ‘Astral Folk’, even garnering a good review from keyboard wizard Rick Wakeman. It’s a shame they’ve split up now, but one can always hope, because this music rocks.

 

The Watch plays Nursery Cryme

Italian prog rockers The Watch are the Genesis continuation we always wanted. Officially endorsed by ex-Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett, they do amazing covers of classic era Genesis songs. Their original albums, while having their own distinct flavour, are tantamount to the Genesis albums that never existed but that totally should have. Imagine, if you will, that Gabriel and Hackett never left and that classic era of music had been allowed to progress in that vein. This would doubtless be the result. I have so much love for this band, so you can imagine my excitement when I heard they were coming to Oslo.

The band kicking off the concert

The concert, held last Saturday the 30th January, was billed as ‘The Watch plays Nursery Cryme’, but what we got was so much more. Not only did we get plenty of The Watch’s own music, including a few wonderful songs inspired by the Italian Alps, but we also got a sly couple of songs from The Lamb Lies Down too. And, let me tell you, as soon as those gentle guitar strums and first Mellotron sweeps hit the air, the room was electric.

“There’s something solid forming in the air,

And the wall of death is lowered in Times Square…”

We could all feel it, and in that moment I knew we were enraptured, part of the show, the adventure. We were all Rael then.

The atmosphere electric continued on as they played through Nursery Cryme with stylised restraint. I loved this aspect of the band – it is clear that they are virtuosos, but they let out only as much as is needed for the song, giving the stark impression that they are holding back a powerful hurricane. The lead singer, in particular, Simone Rossetti, embodied the essence of Gabriel’s countenance in ‘Watcher of the Skies’ – a solitary, austere figure, voice tight as a tightrope walker, letting out just enough of the music to make the maximum impact. Less is more, in this case, and it was magical. It belonged to another universe.

Nursery Cryme was indeed played in its entirety, but not in order. This was a surprise for many in the audience, and by the time the album’s stellar track came out, The Musical Box, we were ecstatic, and more so from the unexpectedness. I was deeply happy with the guitarist, Giorgio Gabriel, and his ability to sound every inch as ethereal and heavenly as Steve Hackett. The sound of his guitar playing like waves lapping at the shore. Songs like Harlequin in particular, so dreamlike.

The keyboardist, Valerio De Vittorio, had amazing technique, using Moog and Mellotron to maximum Seventies effect. This really came into its own on the band’s original songs, where the keyboards seemed more striking than the soft waves of Genesis. And the bassist, Mattia Rossetti, impressed many by handling a multi-neck bass and 12-string guitar. Sometimes it amazes me all over again to witness how every single sound from these songs can be made with a group of just five people. Listening to the records, it is so layered that it always feels like it should be so much more.

Once the final song was over and the dust had settled, the encore came. I couldn’t believe my ears when the band announced they would be playing Supper’s Ready from the album Foxtrot. What a treat! This was so much more than I ever could have expected!

So the twenty-three minute epic journey of apocalypse, as envisioned by Peter Gabriel forty four years earlier. The dulcet tones of the intro began, and everything sounded perfect. The mood in this small blues bar, filled to the brim with fans, was like nothing ever experienced before. All of us, I would hazard to say, knew this song in particular, Genesis’s masterpiece, and united by a common love we all fell under the song’s sway. It would not be an exaggeration to say it was a religious experience.

I have to give particular kudos to the drummer, Marco Fabbri, who tackled the section ‘Apocalypse in 9/8’ with aplomb. I have to admit I’ve never heard someone drumming in this time signature before, and it was so well handled. I also really liked the Gretsch kit, a callback to the kits Phil Collins used in this era, and what was interesting and probably due to how small the venue was (and possibly the fact I was right at the front too), was the hard, punchy tones that resulted – it was quite different to the recordings, but made for a nice offset against the taut vocals and dreamy keyboards and guitars.

I also feel that Simone Rossetti flourished in this song. It felt like the entire concert was leading up to this point – the release of those slightly-off-kilter but perfectly placed vocals. I think Gabriel ought to be so proud.

The clock ticked well over midnight as Supper’s Ready, and the entire gig along with it, drew to a finish. I have heard that The Watch return to Oslo every year, so I am looking forward to next year’s show already. Every time I see such a large crowd coming to attend prog-related shows in Oslo I become ecstatic, almost with disbelief at the fact that there are so many others who share this obsession with the somewhat odd and niche music I listened to in my childhood. It’s a good thing, and this particular experience is one I will remember.

Here’s a link to their album ‘Tracks from the Alps’: